Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Make A Candy Bouquet In A Basket


One way to give someone a lot of candy or larger sized
 candy is to use a basket as the base for your candy bouquet.

Remember, the larger the basket, the more materials
you will need to fill it up to make it look generous. 

After you have selected your basket, get either regular
styrofoam or floral foam to fill it in order to hold you
candies upright. Cut the foam to fit snugly in the basket. 

If you are making several candy bouquet baskets at one
time, you might consider using insulating spray foam
to fill the baskets to save money. The foam costs about
$3-$4 per can and goes a long way. 

Of course, filling baskets is not the original purpose of this
product. It can be tricky to use but is inexpensive. 
I made a separate page about using the spray foam if 
you are interested in finding out more info. 
"Using Spray Foam In Candy Bouquets".

You will see blobs of foam in a couple of the baskets in
this post...it is the spray foam experiment in basket filling.

The round basket came from the Dollar Tree. The oval basket came from a yard sale. Each was $1. 

Since these baskets were going to be used in Valentine
candy bouquets, I spray painted them red.


While the baskets were drying, I prepared the candy by
taping wooden skewers (can be found in the kitchen area 
of grocery stores usually) on the backs of the candy.
On large candy like these heart-shaped boxes, you can use clear shipping tape.
 Several rows of horizontal regular clear tape also works if you don't have the wider tape. 

For smaller candies, you can use smaller skewers.
On candy bars, if you want to hide the skewer, pull the
flap on the backside up. Place a skew along the side of
the flap. Tape the skew down with clear tape. 
Then pull the flap over the skewer and tape it again. 
For health reasons, only used wrapped candy in candy bouquets.

Large candy bars need larger skewers to hold them up.
They can be taped in the same way. 
With flap pulled up, tape the skewer beside the fold.

Then pull the flap over the skewer and tape it down, hiding the skewer.

If the skewers are too long, a good thing to cut them with is
 yard hand clippers. It's like snipping a twig. Easier than scissors.

To add some inexpensive fluff and volume to the painted 
baskets, seasonal paper napkins were used. If the napkins are
two-ply and the back is white, you can separate the two and
just use the more colorful layer. 

Open the napkin up fully, pinch a couple of inches in the
very center, tape it into a stem, fluff the rest of the napkin
upwards. Insert the napkin in between the basket and foam.


Insert the candies on skewers into the foam. Try to keep
the weight of the candies evenly spaced so the basket is not
prone to tip over. Push the candies into the foam by putting
pressure on the skewer and not the candy. The candy might
pop off of the skewer if you push on the candy part. 
This is the Dollar Tree basket with mostly miniature candies.

The photo above and below is the yard sale basket with $1 boxes of candy inserted.

A few additional napkin "fluffs" were added within the candy to hide the foam. 

to see other disguises. 

I remember when my kids were little and I would put 
candy in their Easter baskets that the candy would just
sink into the grass and not look like much. Here's a 
fix for that...put the candy up on skewers!

Put larger items near the back but not so far that
it makes the basket tip over.

Tape candy onto skewers. Push the skewers into the foam.
Add smaller items in the front.
The lollipop bouquet ($1 at WalMart) was opened and bunnies already on sticks inserted also. 

Add Easter grass to cover the foam. 



The baskets in this post are seasonal but you can make
candy bouquets in baskets any time of year with no
"theme" required...just lots of candy!

To see more DIY on candy bouquets click

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