Wednesday, April 27, 2011

A Trip to Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center


On a recent road trip to Texas, we were looking for something 
to do on a Sunday morning and found that 
The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center 
was open and nearby.

( If you are not old enough to know who Lady Bird Johnson is,
she was the wife of Lyndon Johnson,
 who became president when John Kennedy was assassinated back in 1963.)

 One of the causes that was dear to her heart was to
 save native wildflowers and encourage others in the
 country to use them as much as possible. 

 When you see wildflowers  growing along interstates, 
they are there mainly due to her efforts.
  She said "We have impressive and valid reasons 
for using our native plants
---reasons of the soul and pocketbook". 

The most famous of her native Texas
 wildflowers is the Bluebonnet. 
 Normally, it would be abundant along the roadsides 
in Texas in April but due to the drought there this
 year, almost the only bluebonnets we saw were in gardens 
where they had gotten water by means other than rain.   

If you are ever near Austin, Texas, and you like gardening,
 you should take a trip to The Wildflower Center.


They have wonderful examples of how to use native 
wildflowers in fields and in gardens large and small.









The Display Garden section at the center shows that 
"whatever style garden you like, native plants provide the
 beauty, form, and texture you desire". 

The center teaches that native plants don't require as much
 water as conventional garden plants and thus saves our water resources.  Here are some examples from that area:










In very arid areas, a garden area could use texture and visual interest with sand and (something that looks like) sea glass
 (but I really don't know what it is exactly).

This was a mix a low-growing ground covers:

The center also had water features:


Even though I like to look at gardens, I don't do
 much gardening myself, so probably my favorite thing
 at the Wildflower Center was the beautiful use of 
native resources of logs and stone work there in 
the colonnades, buildings, and other structures.











                    My favorite structure was an observation tower. 
It featured a stairwell that had some treads on the 
interior and some treads on the exterior.





There were plants growing along the staircase and 
along the top wall at the top of the tower.

 

      Hopefully, you will find something in these pictures to inspire
       you in your garden no matter how large or small it may be. 

                            I am sharing this post at
             Oh, The Places I've Been @ The Tablescaper blog



16 comments:

Andrea . Charcoal and crayons said...

Looks like such a beautiful place. I really love your photos of the observation tower too!

Heather at Dusty Bay said...

Oh that place looks so cool with all that stone! They sure have some great ideas for wildflowers, landscapes and garden features too!

adventuresindinner said...

Lovely, I especially like the steel water features.

Emily said...

Kitty, thanks for your sweet comment. Pictures say it all.
This is a lovely post, I love wildflowers. To me wildflowers look like mother nature just waved a wand over a bare field and made it come alive with color. I've just become your newest follower......

~Emily
The French Hutch

⚜ ↁℯℬℬᴵℰ⚜ said...

WOW Kitty what a gorgeous place. I love the stone and wood elements. THe flowers and plants are gorgeous too. Thanks for sharing with my newbie party.

Babs said...

Miss Kitty, What beautiful garden. I've often heard of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, I've but never had the opportunity to visit there. What wonderful garden ideas. I love the stone hardscapes and vines on the pergola. Thanks for the inspiration photos and oh,I'm visiting from Debbiedo's Blogging and Blabbing.
Babs

Helen's Decor said...

Thanks for the trip. I'm a native Texan and a new follower. Hope you follow me.
Helen's Decor

Carolyn @ Adrift on the Lake said...

Just beautiful! I loved the photos! I'm from San Antonio and living in Iowa and this was a nice reminder of "home" for me. :) Visiting from Debbiedoos and am now a follower!

Richard Cottrell said...

Oh thanks for sharing this trip. I am sure I will never make it there in person. Just as life goes by this was the next best thing. I am so glad you came by for a visit. Richard at My Old Historic house

Anita @ Cedar Hill Ranch said...

Gorgeous flowers. Did you see my post on the Cedar Hill Wildflowers I have found at the ranch. Forgive me if you have already seen it. http://cedarhillranch.blogspot.com/2011/05/cedar-hill-wildflower-guide.html Click on the wildflower guide link and you will see all of the wildflowers I have found at the ranch; there are 90 some I have found so far. Blessings!!

Pat said...

It's a beautiful place. I remember Lady Bird and I remember when her wonderful wildflower project was brand new.

Sarah said...

Kitty, I'm happy you got to experience the Wildflower Center first hand. It is one of my favorite spots here in Austin. I've long been a fan of Lady Bird Johnson because of her wonderful vision for our country, our state, and Austin. I had the pleasure to meet her on several occasions, and she was such a delightful person with have a conversation with. Thanks for sharing the photos of your visit. They are beautiful! ~ Sarah

The Tablescaper said...

I've heard such wonderful things of Lady Byrd's wonderful works.

Great to have your be a part of the premier of "Oh, the places I've been!"

- The Tablescaper

Diane said...

I have always admired Lady Bird for her interest in preserving wild flowers. I grew up with wild flowers along the side of roads in Georgia and, now, there are almost none. So sad! Thanks for the lovely tour - your photos are wonderful.

ellen b. said...

Love your photos Miss Kitty! This would be a lovely garden to visit. Love the bluebonnets!

Lulu said...

I love this place, especially this time of year. Lady Bird left quite a legacy for Texas.